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E-learning in Higher Education - Rhiannon Evans - Claus Nygaard - Libri Publishing Ltd - Institute for Learning in Higher Education

BOOK: E-learning in Higher Education, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

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E-learning in Higher Education - Rhiannon Evans - Claus Nygaard - Libri Publishing Ltd - Institute for Learning in Higher Education

E-learning in Higher Education

E-learning 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 guides the reader through the design and use of e-learning in higher education referring to the central framework of the book. Readers are invited to reflect on the learning theories underlying their own design practices for e-learning in higher education. The book introduces eight practical examples of e-learning design considerations and e-learning implementations as academic colleagues from around the world present their concrete use-cases of e-learning technologies.

E-learning 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 will enable readers to use the framework for e-learning and its link to associated learning theories to inform their own design and use of e-learning technologies – for the benefit not only of teachers but also the engagement and learning of students.



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E-learning in Higher Education: three perspectives, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

E-learning 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 in Higher Education

Are you prepared for a completely new take on e-learning in higher education?

Then read this book on e-learning in higher education!

As you read this book, you are introduced you to a novel framework for e-learning, which links three types of e-learning to three perceptions of learning. 

In the book, the authors distinguish between these three types of e-learning in higher education:

  • e-learning 1.0 (distribution),
  • e-learning 2.0 (dialogue), and
  • e-learning 3.0 (construction).

In their framework they actively link the use of e-learning in higher education to three theoretical perceptions of learning:

  • e-learning 1.0 (behavioural learning theory),
  • e-learning 2.0 (cognitive learning theory), and
  • e-learning 3.0 (social learning theory).

This book guides you to a well-informed design and use of e-learning activities in Higher Education

By its novel framework for e-learning, the book E-learning 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 in Higher Education guides you to a well-informed design and use of e-learning activities in higher education.

As you read, you are invited to reflect about your own e-learning practice.

  1. Do you use e-learning mainly as a way to distribute information to students in the digital domain?
  2. Do you use e-learning as a way to enhance online communication between learners?
  3. Do you use e-learning as a way to develop a academic identity of students?

Most often, best practice is reflected practice

The book introduces eight examples of reflected practice, as faculty members share their own use-cases of e-learning technologies. Reading their examples of e-learning design, you are invited to reflect on your own design of e-learning in higher education.

Reading the book, therefore, may be benefitial to you, as its framework for e-learning and its use-cases may well inspire you to reflect more closely about your own e-learning practice.

E-learning 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 in Higher Education will enable you to use its novel framework for e-learning and its link to associated learning theories to inform your own design and use of e-learning technologies – for the benefit not only of you as a teacher but more importantly for the engagement and learning outcomes of your students.

 

E-learning 10 20 30 in Higher Education - Rhiannon Evans - Claus Nygaard - Libri Publishing Ltd - Institute for Learning in Higher Education

Pages: 248
Published: 2019
ISBN: 9781911450399

 

About the Editors

Rhiannon Evans is Senior Lecturer in Classics and Ancient History at La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia. She has pioneered the use of e-learning within her academic field.

Professor Claus Nygaard is Executive Director at Institute for Learning in Higher Education, Denmark; Adjunct Professor at Copenhagen Business School, Denmark; Adjunct Professor at the University of Aarhus Denmark; Visiting Professor at Stockholm School of Economics Riga, Latvia. Expert in Management Education, and learning-centred higher education.

Overview of this book about e-learning in higher education

  • Chapter 1: An Introduction to e-learning in higher education: 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0. Malinda Hoskins Lloyd, Willie McGuire, Reya Saliba, Rachid Bendriss, Flemming Meier, Rhiannon Evans, and Claus Nygaard (pp. 1-22)
  • Chapter 2: E-learning as a strategy for improving university students’ learning outcomes. Claus Nygaard (pp. 23-44).
  • Chapter 3: Using a peer-centred online learning platform to support students’ academic-professional transition. Willie McGuire and Olan Harrington (pp. 45-72).
  • Chapter 4: The effectiveness of e-learning in Business Communication at the University of Johannesburg? What students say! Magas R. Pather (pp.73-100).
  • Chapter 5: Using WordPress, Canvas LMS, Dropbox and Facebook to enhance students’ online engagement in postgraduate educationAnne Hørsted (pp.101-114).
  • Chapter 6: Using e-learning to improve the student experience of lecturesRhiannon Evans (pp. 115-136).
  • Chapter 7: The E-CIL framework: an instructional practice for promoting student engagement with content, the instructor, and other learners in online courses. Malinda Hoskins Lloyd (pp. 137-164).
  • Chapter 8: Experiential learning in premedical education: enhancing students’ experience through e-learning. Reya Saliba & Rachid Bendriss (pp. 165-188).
  • Chapter 9: Ten e-learning technologies to support problem-based collaborative work. Flemming Meier & Claus Nygaard (pp. 189-210).
  • Chapter 10: Using e-learning to supervise students’ project work in higher education: some pedagogical requirements.Flemming Meier (pp. 211-228).

 

A detailed description of the chapters in this book about E-learning in Higher Education

Chapter 2, E-learning as a strategy for improving university students’ learning outcomes, is written by Claus Nygaard

In this chapter, Claus discusses three different learning theories (behaviourist theory of learning, cognitive theory of learning, and social theory of learning) and links them to three types of e-learning 1.0 (distribution), 2.0 (dialogue), 3.0 (construction).

His main argument is that any choice of e-learning technology must be informed by a theoretical understanding of learning. This is so because the “e” in itself does not lead to learning.

If we aim to improve students’ learning outcomes using e-learning, our strategy for using e-learning technologies has to be motivated by learning theory.

The most important lesson from his chapter is that when you design curricula for e-learning there are three important questions which have to guide your work:

1) how do you perceive learning?

2) how do you perceive e-learning?

3) how do you perceive curriculum?

Those three questions form the basis of your e-learning strategy and will help you design a curriculum using e-learning which improves students’ learning outcomes.

Claus’ chapter is an inspiring read because it makes us reflect on the theoretical underpinnings of our choice of e-learning technology.

Thus, the novel framework of e-learning 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0, helps us make well-considered decisions on how to design a curriculum for e-learning.

Reading Claus’ chapter, you will:

1) be presented with a central typology for e-learning, which distinguishes between e-learning 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0;

2) be introduced to learning theory and discussions of how different approaches to learning may have implications for your understanding of students’ learning outcomes;

3) be invited to reflect on your own curriculum design, when using e-learning, to improve students’ learning outcomes.

 

Chapter 3, Using a peer-centred online learning platform to support students’ academic-professional transition, is written by Willie McGuire and Olan Harrington

They focus on an alumni project called Teaching-Jobs which focuses on an attempt to shift students from their current 2.0 state in Nygaard’s typology to a condition closer to the construction level descriptive of the 3.0 state.

This is particularly evident in one of the key aims of the project which was to create a self-sustaining support model for future alumni using peer mentoring to create student ownership of the resource and its future iterations.

Their chapter addresses a current issue in the transition from initial teacher qualified status to fully qualified status. The authors conduct a literature review using two case studies to highlight two key aims: the need to develop an evidence-based rationale for the use of a blended learning constructivist pedagogy in supporting this transition and also the enhancement of subject-specific knowledge essential to the transition. One of the key lessons echoes the words of Mick Jagger: “You can’t always get what you want,” as the authors found that there was a considerable gap between their expectations of how students might use the e-learning resource and the reality of its deployment.

Reading Willie’s and Olan’s chapter, you may take away three insights:

1) the reasons why they created the peer-centred online learning platform to support students’ academic-professional transition;

2) two key modes of support: dialogue with peers and access to the online support materials;

3) learn about their attempts to create a self-perpetuating system, by which they mean a resource, which once established, would then be controlled exclusively by alumni for alumni.

 

Chapter 4, The effectiveness of e-learning in Business Communication at the University of Johannesburg? What students say!, is written by Magas R. Pather

Chapter 5, Using WordPress, Canvas LMS, Dropbox and Facebook to enhance students’ online engagement in postgraduate education, is written by Anne Hørsted

 

Chapter 6, Using e-learning to improve the student experience of lectures, is written by Rhiannon Evans

 

Chapter 7, The E-CIL framework: an instructional practice for promoting student engagement with content, the instructor, and other learners in online courses, is written by Malinda Hoskins Lloyd

Chapter 8, Experiential learning in premedical education: enhancing students’ experience through e-learning, is written by Reya Saliba & Rachid Bendriss

Chapter 9, Ten e-learning technologies to support problem-based collaborative work, is written by Flemming Meier & Claus Nygaard

 

Chapter 10, Using e-learning to supervise students’ project work in higher education: some pedagogical requirements, is written by Flemming Meier

 

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